The Reverse Diet

The Reverse Diet- the one, the original!

Here is the breakthrough diet plan that has people all across North America eating better, losing weight, and getting healthier. Now you can stop counting calories, avoiding carbs, and feeling deprived. Eat dinner for breakfast and shed pounds! If you’ve been a yo-yo dieter and nothing seems to work, this terrific new diet plan allows you to lose 20, 50, 100 pounds or even more for good, simply by reversing your meals. Dozens of tasty, easy recipes are included.

From Publishers Weekly

The adage “breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper” inspired this book, for Cunningham, a motivational speaker who lost 172 pounds in nine months with that approach. She and coauthor Skolnik, a nutritionist, met while filming a food-centric segment for Good Morning America, and have paired up to recommend a lifestyle change that emphasizes fueling up with a larger meal early in the day and, in the later hours, replenishing as needed via snacks and smaller meals. While much of the duo’s advice is not new (whole foods are preferable to processed ones, eat more vegetables, avoid sugary sodas), it is intriguing. Food lists, portion information and recipes help with planning ahead—preparing meals ahead of time is also key, the authors say. A section on setting realistic goals aims to help readers manage their expectations, and recommendations for using a “hunger scale” encourage mindfulness. (Jan.)
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Review

The adage “breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper” inspired this book, for Cunningham, a motivational speaker who lost 172 pounds in nine months with that approach. She and coauthor Skolnik, a nutritionist, met while filming a food-centric segment for Good Morning America, and have paired up to recommend a lifestyle change that emphasizes fueling up with a larger meal early in the day and, in the later hours, replenishing as needed via snacks and smaller meals. While much of the duo’s advice is not new (whole foods are preferable to processed ones, eat more vegetables, avoid sugary sodas), it is intriguing. Food lists, portion information and recipes help with planning ahead—preparing meals ahead of time is also key, the authors say. A section on setting realistic goals aims to help readers manage their expectations, and recommendations for using a “hunger scale” encourage mindfulness. (Jan.) (Publishers Weekly, December 11, 2006)